Understanding Limited Liability Company (LLC) Taxation

Once you’ve decided to form a limited liability company (LLC), your next decision is most likely going to be “how am I going to be taxed?” An LLC is not a tax entity. Instead, the IRS considers the LLC “disregarded” and applies tax laws that apply to sole proprietorships, corporations, and partnerships to the LLC. But, to avoid an esoteric discussion of tax law, I hope I can give you enough information in this article to help you in determining which tax entity is best for you.

If your LLC has one owner, it may elect to be a C corporation or S corporation, otherwise it will be a Disregarded Entity.  “Disregarded Entity” means the IRS ignores there is a legal entity between you and the income, losses, assets, etc. for tax purposes. A single owner disregarded entity will be treated as a sole proprietorship. If your LLC has multiple owners, it may elect to be a C corporation or S corporation, otherwise it will be a Disregarded Entity. A multi-owner disregarded entity will be taxed as a partnership.

To be or not to be… Disregarded

          Sole Proprietorships

The single member LLC, when disregarded, is analogous to a sole proprietorship. That is to say, you are your business and your business is you. Per the IRS, as a consequence of not making an election you will report your income and deductions, from your LLC, on a Schedule C, on your Form 1040. This is the simplest form of taxation and provides for single-level taxation. “Single” or “Double” taxation, as you’ll read later, refers to how many times the federal government gets to tax your “income.” With a sole proprietorship the only income tax that applies would be your individual income tax. But, the drawback of the sole proprietorships is that you have to pay Self-Employment Tax on all the income you make from the business. So keeping that in mind, you are going to pay income and self-employment tax on the profit you’ve made.

How much is self-employment tax? Generally it’s 15.3% on the first $117,000. Anything above $117,000 is subject to a 2.9% Medicare tax. There is an Additional Medicare Tax 0.9% tax for income over a threshold amount. The threshold amounts vary by filing status, but if you’re married filing jointly it is $250,000.

So in addition to your self-employment tax of 15.3%, you’re going to pay personal income tax. Assuming a 20% effective personal income tax rate, that’s a whopping 35.3%. Keep in mind that personal tax rates range from 0% to 39.6%, and possibly higher with the investment tax. As my good friend George says, the IRS is not my business partner, and luckily for him and for you there is a tax planning opportunity here.

C and S Corporations

The IRS allows for single members LLCs to elect, according to the check the box rules, to be taxed as a corporation. When you elect to be taxed as a corporation you are electing to be taxed under subchapter C of the internal revenue code, hence the nomenclature “C Corporation.” C corporations pay income tax on their income, though at preferential graduate tax rates. That means the overall tax brackets are lower than individual brackets. The profits stay in the company until there is a distribution. Typically, you’re going to distribute money from the corporation in the form of a dividend. Dividends are taxed at different rates than your income is taxed, typically much lower, at “capital gain” rates of 15-20%. But, you’re paying tax twice. Which is why this generally isn’t used as a tax structure, but the C Corporation’s brother, the S corporation is much more useful in reducing federal taxes.

Subchapter S corporations give the benefit single taxation at the individual level, while relieving some of the self-employment tax. Thus, instead of paying a corporate income tax, the S corporation pays nothing. In exchange, all of the income is deemed to have been distributed to the shareholders, unlike a C corporation, which only taxes its distributions when actually distributed. This is known as “phantom income.” The S corporation shareholders, whether or not they received the distributions, will pay taxes on that amount. One major benefit is that the shareholders do not pay self-employment tax on the income that is considered a distribution. This has the potential to greatly lower your tax bill. But, you have to approach this structure with caution. An S corp. does have to employ someone to do work. So if you’re doing all the work, you do have to pay yourself a “reasonable salary,” and you and the corporation will share the self-employment tax on your amount of compensation and file employment tax returns, Forms 941/944 and Form 940. Individuals get in trouble when they pay themselves too little and all the income as distribution. As in the case of Mr. Watson who found himself in court after paying himself $24,000 in wages and taking $203,651 in distribution.  While paying yourself a less than reasonable salary will lower your tax bill, it places you at risk. Nonetheless, any amount of money on which you do not have to pay employment tax, will reduce your taxes. Here’s an oversimplified example:

You’ve taxable income is $150,000 as an individual and you’re married. As a sole-proprietorship, you pay $39,528 in federal income tax plus $17,901 self-employment tax for a whopping $57,435. You keep $92,565.

If you were operating as an S corporation, let’s assume you pay yourself as a wage $75,000 and receive $75,000 in distributions. First, you’d pay self-employment tax on your wages of $75,000, which is $11,475. Reducing your distribution by that amount leaves you with $69,262 (75k for tax purposes) in compensation in your pocket and $69,262 available for distribution. Your income tax will be $35,928 plus 36% over 140,000. The product being $1,534 plus $35,928, totaling $37,426 in taxes. From $150,000 less self-employment taxes paid, take home $101,099 versus $92,565 as a sole proprietorship. A savings of $8,534 in taxes.

One caveat to keep in mind is that an S corporation generally cannot deduct health insurance and term life premiums while a C corporation can deduct up to $50,000 per employee. If you really wanted to make these amounts deductible, you could actually setup two separate entities and get the best of both worlds, primarily using a management contact.

S corporations also cannot make distributions unevenly, this is known as the “single class of stock” rule and have restrictions on ownership, unlike C corporations.

Partnerships

LLCs, with two or more members, who do not elect to be taxed as a corporation, will be taxed as a partnership. Partnerships, like S corporations, are a pass through tax entity. Meaning, the income is passed directly from the partnership to its Partners. Partnerships do not pay separate income taxes like C corporations. Partners of a partnership are not employees and should not receive a salary. There is a rich, legal history in understanding the employment status of partners in partnerships. Here is a detailed history. Otherwise, understand that a partner will pay self-employment tax on all of his income that flows from the partnership. A partnership can make “guaranteed payments,” which look like a salary to the partner. But, the partner will still need to pay self-employment tax on this income. There are several reasons to avoid the self-employment tax, but there are several reasons why you might choose to be taxed as a partnership.

Partnerships offer the most flexibility with a pass-through tax entity. A partnership will undoubtedly need a partnership agreement, or in the case of an LLC, an operating agreement. Both are contracts that govern the relationship between the entity and its members (LLC) or partners. With a partnership you can get creative in how cash will be distributed, who will be allocated income and losses, foreign or domestic, how debts are repaid, etc. For this reason, when there are multiple members who are not even partners, they often choose to be taxed as a partnership. But, to the extent that your entity doesn’t need a complicated structure of distributions or allocations, it is usually advisable not to be taxed as a partnership.

 A Note on Liability

As a general rule, LLC members are not liable for the debts of the LLC. But, in Florida, in accordance with the Olmstead case, the single member or a single member LLC, may become liable for the debts of the LLC, after the creditor secures a charging order. This is not the case for a multi-member LLC. If you are considering a single member LLC, you may consider a Florida Corporation with an S Corporation election, because you will get the limited liability you are searching for and the benefits of pass through taxation.

Need more help?
If you have more questions or need help establishing your entity please call our offices at (813) 999-0199, www.WalkLawFirm.com.

Frank Lago is an attorney at the Walk Law Firm, PA. HE is a graduate of Stetson University School of Law and holds an LLM in Taxation from Georegetown University.

When the DOL Proposes Changes to the Overtime Rules, Employers Must Take Note

WHEN THE DOL PROPOSES CHANGES TO THE OVERTIME RULES, EMPLOYERS MUST TAKE NOTE.  In 2014, 8,086 lawsuits were filed in federal courts for violations of pay practices under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).  Of these, 1,837 lawsuits, or approximately of 23% of all FLSA lawsuits in the United States, were filed in Florida.  In March 2011, a Florida-based company paid more than $754,000 in overtime back wages following a finding by U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) that its temporary supervisors were misclassified as exempt employeesSimply, improper time and pay practices are costly mistakes.

Earlier this month, the DOL proposed changes to the rules governing the white-collar exemptions (executive, professional, administrative, highly compensated, and computer related employees) to the overtime requirements under the FLSA.  The DOL estimates that the proposed rule changes will extend overtime protections to an additional 5 million employees.  Any business with at least 1 employee, should:

  • Understand the existing rules and proposed changes
  • Assess the impact of how the proposed changes will affect employee classification, timekeeping and pay practices, and payroll
  • Consider submitting comments to the DOL concerning how the proposed changes will affect your business. You may do so at: regulations.gov  on or before September 4, 2015.

THE EXISTING RULES AND THE PROPOSED CHANGES

Currently, under the FLSA, all employees covered by the Act, unless they specifically exempted, must receive overtime pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek at a rate not less than time and one-half their regular rates of pay. Employees who fall within the white collar exemptions are not entitled to receive overtime pay — regardless of the number of hours they work within a workweek.  To fall within one of these exemptions, employees must (1) be paid on a salary basis, (2) be paid at least a fixed minimum salary per week of at least $455.00 per week ($23,660.00), and (3) meet certain requirements as to their primary job duties that are specific to each exemption.

For more detailed discussions on the FLSA, 
please see the videos on the FLSA previously made by our new Of Counsel 
Attorney Kerry Raleigh at:
·         Introduction to FLSA
·         Employee Overtime:  Common Mistakes & Perceptions
·         Employee Overtime: Employers Need to Get It Right

THE PROPOSED CHANGES:

The DOL proposes three key changes to:

  • Set the standard salary requirement for the white collar exemptions from $455.00 per week to the 40th percentile of weekly earnings of full-time salaried workers, which is currently $921.00* per week ($47,892.00* annually);
  • Increase the total annual compensation requirement for the highly compensated employee exemption to the annualized value of the 90th percentile of weekly earnings of full-time salaried workers, which is currently $122,148.00* annually; and
  • Establish a mechanism for automatically updating the salary and compensation levels going forward to ensure that they will continue to provide a useful and effective test for exemption.

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Key Reasons to Create an Employee Handbook— or at least appropriate policies

An Employee Handbook organizes and contains company policies and procedures. There are numerous reasons for employers to choose to issue an Employee Handbook or Employer Policy Manual. Although there is no federal or Florida law requiring private employers to provide a handbook, there are some communications you are required to make to your employees.

Each month, we receive numerous calls form clients with employees who would like to make a change in how they handle anything from payroll to work hours to ethics matters and use of computers, mobile phones, tablets, internet, social media and websites. Without policies and procedures in place, and without a clear statement of expectations, clients often find themselves stuck on making changes and communicating expectations.

Policies are governed by both federal law and state specific law and regulations. Compliance with both is a necessity. The Federal Department of Labor has a terrific tool called E-laws Adviser. At the Walk Law Firm, we recommend our clients review and use that tool in addition to calling us for advice. It covers wage and hour laws as well as other important matters such as determining if someone and independent contractor or an employee.

At the Walk Law Firm, we pride ourselves in assisting our clients with practical advice that is compliant with the law. Not every decision is black and white and when making decisions to eliminate a position or downsize in general, it is important to seek quality advice. We represent employers primarily, but have also assisted many executives as well as employers with executive compensation matters such as stock bonuses or stock incentive plans or other equity incentive plans, separation agreements and employment agreements.

Employee Handbook FAQs:

  • An Employee Handbook introduces new employees to the company, gives the company a chance to set forth your expectations for your employees, and provides an introduction to the company;
  • An Employee Handbook makes it easier to ensure that all employees receive notice of the company’s policies;
  • An Employee Handbook creates a centralized place for employees to look for answers and guidance on your company’s practices and expectations, and what to do in various situations; and
  • An Employee Handbook and signed acknowledgments of receipt can assist in an employer’s legal defense, such as when non-compliance leads to termination of employment or another kind of adverse employment action.

Do Not Inadvertently Create a Contract

  • Employee Handbooks must be drafted in a manner that does not create legal obligations that the employer did not intend, and contain provisions reserving certain employer rights. Preparation of the handbook or at least review by your counsel is crucial.

Maintaining a Handbook

  • Employers must review Employee Handbooks periodically to ensure that all policies are current and lawful. At a minimum, a handbook must be reviewed and revised, if necessary, when there is a change in the law, employer policies or procedures, and when the employer expands into new states.Employer

Florida Annual Report for LLC’s, Corporations and Partnerships due by May 1

Many of you have corporations and limited liability companies domiciled in Florida and other states. As you know, to keep those companies active, it is necessary in most states to file some variety of an annual report or franchise report. You will likely receive emails or mail to your principal address listed in the state records, but often it looks like junk mail that can be ignored, or is sometimes set aside and just simply forgotten. There are also companies that send very official looking letters offering to update your records for a fee. These updates are advertisements and may or may not include filing your state annual report. You can tell if they are advertisements by looking carefully at the fine print.

For those of you doing business in Florida, the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations requires each organized business doing business in the state, whether a corporation, limited liability company, or partnership, whether domiciled or just licensed to do business in the state, to file an annual report between January 1st and May 1st of each year in order to maintain an active status in Florida. The annual report is used to confirm or update the Florida Department of State, Division of Corporation’s records, including information related to the managers, members, officers and directors, the registered agent or registered office, the principal address or mailing address, and the federal employer identification number. For other states, similar reports and fees will also be required. The timing varies and it is important to check the dates so that you do not miss important deadlines.

If the annual report is timely filed between January 1st and May 1st, the reporting fee is as follows: $150 for a profit corporation; $61.25 for a not for profit corporation; $138.75 for a limited liability company; and $500 for a limited partnership or limited liability limited partnership. A $400 late fee will be assessed for any report filed after May 1st for profit corporations, limited liability companies, limited partnerships and limited liability limited partnerships. Failure to file an annual report by the third (3rd) Friday of September will result in the administrative dissolution or revocation of the business entity on the records of the Florida Department of State.

In addition, the Florida LLC Act has been revised and restated in whole. Effective January 1, 2014, any new limited liability company formed will need to be formed pursuant to the new Act. Any existing entity will need to amend its operating agreement and articles to reflect the new Act no later than December 31, 2015. With that in mind, we are recommending to clients that the amendments be done now and that the Annual Report filing be made reflecting the new Act requirements, specifically, the elimination of the concept of Managing Member. We also recommend filing a Statement of authority recognizing those in your company authorized to act on behalf of the LLC. This may avoid the need to file additional amendments during the year.

We are ready and able to assist you in amending your operating agreements and answering questions regarding the new Act. We are also available to assist you in properly filing your annual report in Florida and assisting you with other states.

The annual for Florida report can be submitted electronically on Sunbiz.org. Annual reports filed using credit card, debit card or Sunbiz E-file Accounts through the E-Filing tab on Sunbiz.org are processed immediately and should be posted on Sunbiz.org within twenty-four (24) hours. Check and money order payments must be submitted by mail and are processed within twenty-one (21) days, so e-filing is the preferred method of filing. For Delaware companies, the annual reported can also be submitted by following this LINK.

The e-filing process is very simple and can be completed in minutes. An Overview and Step-by-step instructions for completing the annual report can be found HERE.

If you have any questions or concerns, please let us know and we would be happy to assist you with completing the annual report.

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What is a Business Divorce?

Last month, I wrote about the not so odd couple – business divorce. In continuing my educational efforts and with the hope we can help folks in business avoid some of the most difficult issues faced when breaking up with a business partner, I am continuing my blog series on Business Divorce….

Business Divorce comes in many forms but has one common characteristic — the owners are at odds, or in agreement, and want or need to attend to the separation of their business interests. The typical reasons include, but are not limited to:

  1. Generational transitions;
  2. Owners are deadlocked on a material matter preventing the business from moving forward;
  3. The owners have different visions for the future;
  4. One or more owners needs or wants to cash out;
  5. A partner has become disabled or divorces and there are no contractual provisions which are triggered;
  6. One of the owners of a business is divorcing or separating from his or her spouse or life partner, which triggers one or more clauses in governance documents of a company;
  7. An owner becomes a debtor in a bankruptcy;
  8. An owner has committed fraud or has taken corporate assets as their own without the consent of other owners;
  9. An owner manager has committed waste;
  10. An owner is no longer contributing or supporting the business as part of management or financially.

When these matters come to me as a lawyer, I still deploy my mediator skills to seek an amicable resolution whenever possible. As a mediator, I employ my extensive knowledge of business law and my creative energy to find middle ground that brings the matter to resolution. As an attorney and mediator, I look to the governing documents (Bylaws, operating agreements, partnership agreements, shareholder agreements, actions by the Board and Management …. ) and governing law to advise my clients and to navigate the often treacherous waters.

I am often surprised that lawyers and clients have failed to address some of these items up front when creating the business. My clients know that we always discuss the “Parade of Horribles” when drafting governing documents, with the hope of avoiding undue conflict at the time the business is sold or owners separate.

In future articles, I will focus on the specific concerns that arise in business divorce and ways in which owners might avoid these issues with some up front planning.

Business Divorce – The Not So Odd Couple

Recently, I added the certification of family law mediator to my already extensive list of mediation certifications to the surprise of many of my friends and associates. It should not be surprising that an attorney with an active mediation practice would mediate family law matters in addition to other business, insurance, bankruptcy, patent and intellectual property and other disputes, it’s just that my law practice has been heavily focused on business matters and it appears that I have never been engaged in the area of family law, but actually I have.

My typical practice involves representing businesses and their owners in all aspects of business life.  I have been the Chief Legal Officer and Chief Administrative Officer for public and private companies, have navigated Boards of Directors and CEOs through Chapter 11 Bankruptcies, hostile take overs, mergers, acquisitions and a variety of other crises. Sometimes those crises and matters include the addition of new owners, the separation of executives and owners, disgruntled minority owners and overcoming deadlocks. In my post “big” business life, I have started a law firm that offers the same quality and level of service provided to our nation’s biggest companies to small and middle-sized businesses on a fee structure that smaller businesses can afford. The issues are no simpler; the legal services no less complex, and the need to protect business assets, confidentiality, dignity and reputation at least as challenging.

Complicating the business of small business today is the close relationship between business partners and life partners. I am finding often that the break-up of life partners can cause mass disruption to unrelated business interests and partners, especially when there are no provisions in operating agreements or shareholders agreements covering these issues. Sometimes, life partners are business partners as well. Even without the complication of life partners, I am finding that business people go into business with others without adequate diligence and without formalizing agreements at all. In the last six months alone, I have been engaged or consulted as either a mediator or lawyer in at least a half dozen situations in which business partners are seeking a “business divorce.” And I must say, my skills and knowledge gained through family law mediation combined with my business law knowledge and acumen has come in pretty handy.

If I can help you as a mediator confidentially settle your business disputes, or help you as an attorney negotiate your deal with your partners, please contact me by completing the form below or calling our office at 813.999.0199.

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Attorney Rochelle Friedman Walk has Achieved the AV Preeminent® Rating – the Highest Possible Rating from Martindale-Hubbell®.

NEWS:    In the world of lawyers, there are many honors and opportunities to buy plaques and spend money to bolster one’s career, but in my book, only some honors worthy of sharing. I have recently learned that I was named a Top Lawyer in Tampa Bay for 2012 and again for 2013 by Law.com, the National Law Journal and some other related publications. This honor stems from my AV – Preeminent Rating, which I achieved and have maintained for more than 10 years. It truly is an honor to be rated by other attorneys in the top category for both ethical standards and legal ability. Some details of the honor:

Rochelle Friedman Walk, a lawyer and mediator based in Tampa, FL whose primary areas of practice are Business and Commercial Law and Alternative Dispute Resolution, has earned the AV Preeminent® rating from Martindale-Hubbell®

“Tampa, FL, March 4, 2013 – Martindale-Hubbell, a division of LexisNexis®, has confirmed that attorney Rochelle Friedman Walk still maintains the AV Preeminent Rating, Martindale-Hubbell’s highest possible rating for both ethical standards and legal ability, even after first achieving this rating in 2002,” according to the press release I received today.

The Martindale-Hubbell AV Preeminent® rating was started more than 130 years ago and is used by attorneys while searching for their own expert attorneys. With websites and social media, anyone can determine a lawyer’s rating by looking  it up on Lawyers.com or martindale.com. The Martindale-Hubbell® AV Preeminent® rating is the highest possible rating for an attorney for both ethical standards and legal ability. This rating represents the pinnacle of professional excellence. It is achieved only after an attorney has been reviewed and recommended by their peers – members of the bar and the judiciary.

The Walk Law Firm provides general counsel and mediation services to a diverse array of local, national and even international clients with particular focus on providing practical business counsel and alternative dispute resolution for businesses with small or nonexistent legal departments. I initially launched the firm to better serve business and mediation clients. Our focus is to assist businesses and entrepreneurs achieve their goals in a cost-effective and expedient manner. Our lean cost structure is designed to keep the burden of significant overhead costs low.

I am also a Florida Supreme Court certified Circuit Civil and Appellate Mediator, serve on the FINRA, Bankruptcy Court and Middle District mediation panels, handling business and financial meditations for parties wanting an experienced executive and lawyer mediate their matters.

To find out more or to contact Rochelle Friedman Walk of Tampa, FL, call 813-999-0199, or visit www.WalkLawFirm.com.

As a result of this honor, American Registry LLC, has added Rochelle Friedman Walk to The Registry™ of Business and Professional Excellence. For more information, search The Registry™ at http://www.americanregistry.com.

I am very proud that I have achieved the AV Preeminent® Rating – the highest possible rating from Martindale-Hubbell®.