When the DOL Proposes Changes to the Overtime Rules, Employers Must Take Note

WHEN THE DOL PROPOSES CHANGES TO THE OVERTIME RULES, EMPLOYERS MUST TAKE NOTE.  In 2014, 8,086 lawsuits were filed in federal courts for violations of pay practices under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”).  Of these, 1,837 lawsuits, or approximately of 23% of all FLSA lawsuits in the United States, were filed in Florida.  In March 2011, a Florida-based company paid more than $754,000 in overtime back wages following a finding by U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) that its temporary supervisors were misclassified as exempt employeesSimply, improper time and pay practices are costly mistakes.

Earlier this month, the DOL proposed changes to the rules governing the white-collar exemptions (executive, professional, administrative, highly compensated, and computer related employees) to the overtime requirements under the FLSA.  The DOL estimates that the proposed rule changes will extend overtime protections to an additional 5 million employees.  Any business with at least 1 employee, should:

  • Understand the existing rules and proposed changes
  • Assess the impact of how the proposed changes will affect employee classification, timekeeping and pay practices, and payroll
  • Consider submitting comments to the DOL concerning how the proposed changes will affect your business. You may do so at: regulations.gov  on or before September 4, 2015.

THE EXISTING RULES AND THE PROPOSED CHANGES

Currently, under the FLSA, all employees covered by the Act, unless they specifically exempted, must receive overtime pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek at a rate not less than time and one-half their regular rates of pay. Employees who fall within the white collar exemptions are not entitled to receive overtime pay — regardless of the number of hours they work within a workweek.  To fall within one of these exemptions, employees must (1) be paid on a salary basis, (2) be paid at least a fixed minimum salary per week of at least $455.00 per week ($23,660.00), and (3) meet certain requirements as to their primary job duties that are specific to each exemption.

For more detailed discussions on the FLSA, 
please see the videos on the FLSA previously made by our new Of Counsel 
Attorney Kerry Raleigh at:
·         Introduction to FLSA
·         Employee Overtime:  Common Mistakes & Perceptions
·         Employee Overtime: Employers Need to Get It Right

THE PROPOSED CHANGES:

The DOL proposes three key changes to:

  • Set the standard salary requirement for the white collar exemptions from $455.00 per week to the 40th percentile of weekly earnings of full-time salaried workers, which is currently $921.00* per week ($47,892.00* annually);
  • Increase the total annual compensation requirement for the highly compensated employee exemption to the annualized value of the 90th percentile of weekly earnings of full-time salaried workers, which is currently $122,148.00* annually; and
  • Establish a mechanism for automatically updating the salary and compensation levels going forward to ensure that they will continue to provide a useful and effective test for exemption.

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Key Reasons to Create an Employee Handbook— or at least appropriate policies

An Employee Handbook organizes and contains company policies and procedures. There are numerous reasons for employers to choose to issue an Employee Handbook or Employer Policy Manual. Although there is no federal or Florida law requiring private employers to provide a handbook, there are some communications you are required to make to your employees.

Each month, we receive numerous calls form clients with employees who would like to make a change in how they handle anything from payroll to work hours to ethics matters and use of computers, mobile phones, tablets, internet, social media and websites. Without policies and procedures in place, and without a clear statement of expectations, clients often find themselves stuck on making changes and communicating expectations.

Policies are governed by both federal law and state specific law and regulations. Compliance with both is a necessity. The Federal Department of Labor has a terrific tool called E-laws Adviser. At the Walk Law Firm, we recommend our clients review and use that tool in addition to calling us for advice. It covers wage and hour laws as well as other important matters such as determining if someone and independent contractor or an employee.

At the Walk Law Firm, we pride ourselves in assisting our clients with practical advice that is compliant with the law. Not every decision is black and white and when making decisions to eliminate a position or downsize in general, it is important to seek quality advice. We represent employers primarily, but have also assisted many executives as well as employers with executive compensation matters such as stock bonuses or stock incentive plans or other equity incentive plans, separation agreements and employment agreements.

Employee Handbook FAQs:

  • An Employee Handbook introduces new employees to the company, gives the company a chance to set forth your expectations for your employees, and provides an introduction to the company;
  • An Employee Handbook makes it easier to ensure that all employees receive notice of the company’s policies;
  • An Employee Handbook creates a centralized place for employees to look for answers and guidance on your company’s practices and expectations, and what to do in various situations; and
  • An Employee Handbook and signed acknowledgments of receipt can assist in an employer’s legal defense, such as when non-compliance leads to termination of employment or another kind of adverse employment action.

Do Not Inadvertently Create a Contract

  • Employee Handbooks must be drafted in a manner that does not create legal obligations that the employer did not intend, and contain provisions reserving certain employer rights. Preparation of the handbook or at least review by your counsel is crucial.

Maintaining a Handbook

  • Employers must review Employee Handbooks periodically to ensure that all policies are current and lawful. At a minimum, a handbook must be reviewed and revised, if necessary, when there is a change in the law, employer policies or procedures, and when the employer expands into new states.Employer