Credibility Education for Tampa’s Small Businesses

Summary: Tampa Bay based company creates partnership with national and local businesses to provide credit and business growth strategies for qualified small businesses.

Tampa, FL – October 1, 2013 – Nationally recognized consumer and small business finance advocate, S.E. Day will host the For Small Business Only, LLC (FSBO) Business Education seminar.  Utilizing strategic alignments with corporate creditors and vendors, the FSBO seminar will provide qualified small businesses with credit building tools that assist in establishing their business credit profiles through credit reporting bureaus including Dun & Bradstreet’s PAYDEX® score.  The seminar is a one day event and will be held on October 22, 2013 at the Steinbrenner Pavilion (across from the Bucs stadium).

“The #1 challenge faced by every small business is successfully establishing business credit without using the owner’s personal credit,” states S.E. Day, founder of FSBO and host of The Legally Steal Show hosted by S.E. Day™.  “At FSBO, we work from the top down through innovation and strategy. We have aligned with major U.S. corporate creditors to provide credit tools and accounts that assist small businesses in building business credit and establishing their PAYDEX® Score.  We are also partnering with local small business owners and thought leaders like attorney Rochelle Walk to provide education and strategies to assist the participant in growing their businesses from sustainability to profitability.”

“Our firm represents and works with many small businesses and we strongly believe that success of small business is fundamental to the success of our economy ,” states Rochelle Walk, President and Owner of Walk Law Firm, PA.  “The FSBO Event will be an opportunity to provide the participants with education  regarding legal concerns and legal planning aspects of being properly prepared to grow their businesses to the next level.”

For further information and registration about the For Small Business Only Business Education seminar, please visit the website at www.ForSmallBusinessOnly.com or call 813-379-7248.  To determine if a business qualifies for credit products through FSBO, please email Info@ForSmallBusinessOnly; or, visit LinkedIn, click on groups, and join the For Small Business Only group today and get registered.

About For Small Business Only (FSBO)
FSBO is a Florida-based company providing qualified small business owners with practical knowledge and applications specifically designed to enhance their business presence and increase their bottom line.

To qualify for credit products and trade accounts, participants with For Small Business Only, LLC must meet the following requirements: be in business for a period of one to two years; possess a current, legal business structure with their state’s Secretary of State; possess a complete business address and business telephone number (no P.O. Boxes allowed, home office addresses are acceptable); and, have an IRS issued tax ID number.

Contact

S.E. Day
The Legally Steal Show
813-379-7248 ph
FSBO@legallysteal.com
www.ForSmallBusinessOnly.com

What is a Business Divorce?

Last month, I wrote about the not so odd couple – business divorce. In continuing my educational efforts and with the hope we can help folks in business avoid some of the most difficult issues faced when breaking up with a business partner, I am continuing my blog series on Business Divorce….

Business Divorce comes in many forms but has one common characteristic — the owners are at odds, or in agreement, and want or need to attend to the separation of their business interests. The typical reasons include, but are not limited to:

  1. Generational transitions;
  2. Owners are deadlocked on a material matter preventing the business from moving forward;
  3. The owners have different visions for the future;
  4. One or more owners needs or wants to cash out;
  5. A partner has become disabled or divorces and there are no contractual provisions which are triggered;
  6. One of the owners of a business is divorcing or separating from his or her spouse or life partner, which triggers one or more clauses in governance documents of a company;
  7. An owner becomes a debtor in a bankruptcy;
  8. An owner has committed fraud or has taken corporate assets as their own without the consent of other owners;
  9. An owner manager has committed waste;
  10. An owner is no longer contributing or supporting the business as part of management or financially.

When these matters come to me as a lawyer, I still deploy my mediator skills to seek an amicable resolution whenever possible. As a mediator, I employ my extensive knowledge of business law and my creative energy to find middle ground that brings the matter to resolution. As an attorney and mediator, I look to the governing documents (Bylaws, operating agreements, partnership agreements, shareholder agreements, actions by the Board and Management …. ) and governing law to advise my clients and to navigate the often treacherous waters.

I am often surprised that lawyers and clients have failed to address some of these items up front when creating the business. My clients know that we always discuss the “Parade of Horribles” when drafting governing documents, with the hope of avoiding undue conflict at the time the business is sold or owners separate.

In future articles, I will focus on the specific concerns that arise in business divorce and ways in which owners might avoid these issues with some up front planning.

Business Divorce – The Not So Odd Couple

Recently, I added the certification of family law mediator to my already extensive list of mediation certifications to the surprise of many of my friends and associates. It should not be surprising that an attorney with an active mediation practice would mediate family law matters in addition to other business, insurance, bankruptcy, patent and intellectual property and other disputes, it’s just that my law practice has been heavily focused on business matters and it appears that I have never been engaged in the area of family law, but actually I have.

My typical practice involves representing businesses and their owners in all aspects of business life.  I have been the Chief Legal Officer and Chief Administrative Officer for public and private companies, have navigated Boards of Directors and CEOs through Chapter 11 Bankruptcies, hostile take overs, mergers, acquisitions and a variety of other crises. Sometimes those crises and matters include the addition of new owners, the separation of executives and owners, disgruntled minority owners and overcoming deadlocks. In my post “big” business life, I have started a law firm that offers the same quality and level of service provided to our nation’s biggest companies to small and middle-sized businesses on a fee structure that smaller businesses can afford. The issues are no simpler; the legal services no less complex, and the need to protect business assets, confidentiality, dignity and reputation at least as challenging.

Complicating the business of small business today is the close relationship between business partners and life partners. I am finding often that the break-up of life partners can cause mass disruption to unrelated business interests and partners, especially when there are no provisions in operating agreements or shareholders agreements covering these issues. Sometimes, life partners are business partners as well. Even without the complication of life partners, I am finding that business people go into business with others without adequate diligence and without formalizing agreements at all. In the last six months alone, I have been engaged or consulted as either a mediator or lawyer in at least a half dozen situations in which business partners are seeking a “business divorce.” And I must say, my skills and knowledge gained through family law mediation combined with my business law knowledge and acumen has come in pretty handy.

If I can help you as a mediator confidentially settle your business disputes, or help you as an attorney negotiate your deal with your partners, please contact me by completing the form below or calling our office at 813.999.0199.

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IP Basics for Start-Ups and Business

When you start a businessintellectual property protection should be a primary part of your start-up business plan.  What intellectually property (IP) has your business developed?  Why should you protect it? And, more importantly, how do you go about protecting the various types of intellectual property that your business owns?  Every business is different and will have different intellectual property considerations, so it’s important to develop a strategy on how your business intends to protect its unique inventions, innovations, and information. It is important to remember that your trade name, ideas,  concepts and customer lists are important assets of your business — assets that need protection.

 

What is your intellectual property?

Intellectual property refers to creative and innovative inventions, marks, designs, or works of authorship that you or your business independently created.  Ask yourself this question, “If you gave this product, information, or design away, could it hinder or prevent you from competing in your industry’s market; would it prevent or impact your profitability?” If the answer is yes, then it is more than likely some form of intellectual property.

 

There are several different types of intellectual property that your business should consider when taking an inventory of its IP for business planning purposes, including: (i)patents, or new or improved inventions, including products and processes; (ii)trademarks, or logos, brands, and designs; (iii) copyrights, or unique works of authorship, including software, articles, books, brochures, artwork, music, etc.; and (iv)trade secrets, or formulas, patterns, compilations used in a business to gain an economic or commercial edge over competitors.

 

In the early stages of your business plan, you should take an inventory of what types of intellectual property that your company owns and which intellectual property is worth protecting.  In other words, examine your business to see what might be eligible for intellectual property protection, including patent, trademark, copyright or trade secret protection, and determine the value that these inventions, innovations, or information provide to your business.  The state and federal protections afforded to intellectual property owners are designed to reward your creativity and provide you with an economic or commercial benefit, so take advantage of these protections.

 

Why should you protect your intellectual property?

Your intellectual property is an asset of your company just like your office, or your bank account.  In fact, depending on the size of your company, and the importance or value of the intellectual property, you can easily include your IP as an asset value on your corporate balance sheet.  Your intellectual property distinguishes you and your product or services from those of your competitors and their products and services.  Just like any other corporate asset, you need to safeguard your intellectual property.  If you fail to adequately protect and police your intellectual property, your competitors, and even worse, your own employees or contractors, can study, steal, and improve upon your product or service and run you right out of the market.

 

Also, social media has exponentially increased the speed of informational posting and exchanges.   This is important for a number of reasons – one, the simplicity of these social media outlets allows you to quickly and easily put information out there that you may have failed to adequately protect that is accessible to consumers, clients, and competitors; and two, a competitor can just as easily steal, improve, and disseminate the information, which could seriously impact the economic benefit of the intellectual property to your business.

 

Additionally, registration is sometimes a requirement for pursuing a legal remedy (e.g., copyrights), so it is extremely important to register early.  And finally, another reason why you should invest now in your IP’s adequate protections is because a lawsuit later will be far more costly than the application and registration fees and the attorneys’ fees for consultation and filing.

 

How do you protect your intellectual property?

It is extremely important to consider and build intellectual property concerns into your business plan. You should educate yourself and your team on the basics of trademarks, copyrights, patents, and trade secrets, so at the very least, you know when something has been created that has the potential to be afforded protection.  Next, you will want to register your IP, either at the state or federal level, depending on the level of protection you desire.  Because of the unique nature of your business, and because the various types of intellectual property are protected in different ways through various registration processes, it is good idea to at least consult with an intellectual property attorney who is familiar with start-up businesses and familiar with your industry.  An attorney can help you file the appropriate state or federal registration, and often such tasks can be completed on flat or capped fees.  They can also help you protect your IP while registration is pending.

You should also establish corporate policies regulating ownership of your business’s new and existing intellectual property.  Often times, it’s not a competitor stealing a business’s IP; it’s a former employee, independent contractor, or partner who undermines the business. Have your employees and contractors execute adequate protection documentation, including well-drafted non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements, employment agreements, independent contractor agreements, etc.

Finally, once you have registered your IP, you should actively police it.  Collaborate with your clients, vendors, merchants, and anybody else who helps you get your product or service into the stream of commerce and keep your eyes open for illegal duplication of your product and/or services.  It is the owner’s responsibility to police its own intellectual property and to insist on legal compliance of the respective laws, rules, and regulations when you find someone infringing upon your IP rights.

 

Florida Legislature Passes New Revised Limited Liability Company Act – Important Reading for Members and Managers of LLCs

Intro

On May 3, 2013, the Florida House of Representatives unanimously passed the new Florida Revised Limited Liability Company Act (the “New Florida LLC Act”).  The Florida Senate unanimously passed a companion bill a week earlier.  Governor Scott approved the bill without issue or opposition on June 14, 2013.  Since LLCs are the most common form of business in Florida, this article is important reading for all business owners, especially owners seeking to protect their LLC assets and personal assets as soon as 2014. The New LLC Act will be codified as Chapter 605 of the Florida Statutes and will govern limited liability companies (“LLCs”) within the state of Florida.  The New Florida LLC Act is materially different, in both form and substance, than the Existing Florida Revised Limited Liability Company Act (the “Existing Florida LLC Act”), which is codified in Chapter 608 of the Florida Statutes.  If you or your company is an existing Member or Manager of a Florida LLC, or if you plan to become one in the near future, it is extremely important to understand the New Florida LLC Act and how it may impact your existing and future operating agreements and other governance documents.   The summary below is not a comprehensive review of the new LLC Act and is not intended to replace the advice of an attorney, but rather is designed to help you assess your own LLCs and potential need to take action.

When will the New Florida LLC Act become effective?

 The New Florida LLC Act becomes effective on January 1, 2014 for all LLCs formed in Florida on or after January 1, 2014.  For all LLCs in existence prior to January 1, 2014, the New Florida LLC Act will not become effective until January 1, 2015; however, the members of an LLC may elect to have the New Florida LLC Act become effective as early as January 1, 2014. To do so, the governing documents of the LLC will need to be amended.

How will the New Florida LLC Act impact my LLC?

 The New Florida LLC Act, like the Existing Florida LLC Act, and like most business organization statutes, is a default statute, which means that it provides a set of standard rules governing LLCs and how they are organized, how they operate, and how they are governed.  These standard rules may be modified, with limited exceptions, through specific language contained in either the Articles of Organization or the LLC’s operating or management agreement.  Like all LLC statutes, the New Florida LLC Act specifically prohibits the LLC from including language that modifies or supersedes certain statutory provisions (these are often referred to as “non-waivable provisions”).  This is significant because the New Florida LLC Act expanded the number of provisions which are now,  non-waivable and may not be altered by agreement of the members.

What changes were made in the New Florida LLC Act?

Expanded Non-Waivable Provisions.  The New Florida LLC Act has clarified that an LLC’s operating agreement may not remove certain rights, obligations and authority granted by the Act. Some of the provisions which an operating agreement may not change include:

  1.  The ability of the LLC to sue and be sued in its own name
  2. The right of a member to maintain a direct cause of action against the LLC, another member, or a manager in order to enforce such member’s rights and otherwise protect such member’s interest
  3. The right of a member to maintain a derivative action
  4. The right of an LLC to refuse to relieve persons, including members and managers, from liability if such persons acted in bad faith or committed willful, or intentional misconduct or a knowing violation of the law
  5. A Member’s or Manager’s duty of care, duty of loyalty, or obligation of good faith and fair dealing The  power of a member to dissociate from the LLC
  6. Statutory requirements with respect to the  contents of a plan of merger, plan of interest exchange, plan of conversion, or plan of domestication, plan of dissolution, articles of organization, statutory agents and other similar provisions
  7. The applicable governing law of the Florida LLC

Managing Member Eliminated.  Under the Existing LLC Act, there are three potential management options:  (1) Member managed, (2) Manager managed, and (3) Managing Member managed.  The New Florida LLC Act has effectively eliminated the concept of Managing Member managed.  It is possible that your operating agreement may need to be amended in order to avoid confusion, unintended results, and unintended personal liabilities, and to make very clear which of the remaining options you intend to use for your LLC.  For example:  once the New Florida LLC Act becomes effective, for those LLCs that are Managing Member managed, the Managing Member may no longer be able to act alone and may require all authorized actions to be subject to a member vote in accordance with the operating agreement.  In order to avoid an unintended result, you should revise your operating agreement and governance documents to reflect the intent of the members.

New Statement of Authority.

The New Florida LLC Act allows an LLC to file a statement of authority with the Florida Department of State as a way of providing constructive notice to third parties regarding persons authorized to act on behalf of the LLC.  The Statement of Authority will be effective for five years from the last amended or filed Statement of Authority, unless terminated earlier in accordance with the New Florida LLC Act.  You should consult with an attorney to determine the implication of filing a Statement of Authority and whether such Statement of Authority would be beneficial for your LLC.

Other Changes.

  •  Non-US entities are now permitted to domesticate as a Florida LLC
  • Non-economic members (members that don’t or are not obligated to contribute) are now permitted
  • The new Act includes specific service of process rules for LLCs

What should I do with my existing operating agreement?  Moving forward, how will my operating agreements be different?

If you or your company are a member or manager of an existing LLC, or are planning to enter into a new LLC, you need to understand the New Florida LLC Act and all the changes that were recently made.  At minimum, you should review your operating agreement with a qualified business attorney. LLC Agreements need to reflect how the members desire to operate the business. An experienced and practical business attorney will help you navigate the new Florida LLC Act in a way to help you amend your operating agreement to be consistent with your intent and operations.

The Walk Law Firm is available to review your operating agreement and help you understand the impact the New Florida LLC Act will have on your Florida entity. Operating reviews can be handled on a Flat Fee or Fixed Fee basis.   As experienced Florida business and commercial law attorneys, we have studied the New Florida LLC Act and can work with you to revise, amend, restate and draft new provisions for your LLC management and operating agreements eliminating unintended confusion or results.

 

Business Identity Theft: What is it? And how do I protect my business assets?

What is it?

Business identity theft is the fraudulent and unauthorized use of an entity’s identity.  It’s not just an information security breach. Rather, like consumer identity theft, business identity thieves impersonate the business or hijack the business’s identity in order to steal money or property, often by establishing lines of credit with banks and/or retailers. A corporate identity is an asset that needs protection!

Who is targeted?

The potential for more lucrative results has spawned an evolution of identity theft.  Rather than targeting a consumer, identity thieves are targeting unsuspecting businesses because businesses tend to have larger bank account balances, higher credit limits, and larger purchases made on behalf of a corporate entity generally don’t set off bells and whistles.  Small businesses are particularly vulnerable because they don’t have resources to constantly monitor accounts and records, and because they don’t have the structured security that large businesses have.

What is the result?

Generally, the damage that results from business identity theft is more severe than the results from consumer identity theft.  In consumer identity theft, the consequences tend to reach only the consumer targeted.  In business identity theft, the consequences affect the targeted business, but also the business’s employees and subcontractors, the business’s creditors, and the economy at large.

You might struggle obtaining a line of credit, which could impact operations. The cost of repairing or cleaning up the aftermath of a business identity theft can be costly with legal and accounting fees.

The terrible irony is that few businesses and business owners think about identity theft prevention as asset protection. But it actually is the most important asset protection plan a business can have.

How to prevent it?

At the Walk Law Firm, as Tampa small business attorneys, we advise our clients to take the same actions that public companies take:

  1. Protect your business information records – treat your EIN and Tax ID numbers like they are your social security number and limit access to all corporate records
  2. Monitor your corporate filings – many secretaries of state, including Florida, have email alert systems that notify you of any and all activity – enrolling in this service can provide early fraud detection
  3. Segregate Duties – accountants and auditors will tell you that no employee should be given access to all banking information as well as typical bank logins and passwords; segregate the duties relating to account access from those handling payroll and accounts payable
  4. Monitor your accounts and bills – frequent monitoring and reporting of suspicious transactions will limit your liability significantly
  5. Monitor the business’s credit report – routinely obtain a business credit report and review it for suspicious activity
  6. Train your employees to protect business information and to be aware of these crimes
  7. Be wary of phishing scams
  8. Install and utilize a firewall on your business computer and network
  9. Contact your creditors to ask about unusual activity