Business Identity Theft: What is it? And how do I protect my business assets?

What is it?

Business identity theft is the fraudulent and unauthorized use of an entity’s identity.  It’s not just an information security breach. Rather, like consumer identity theft, business identity thieves impersonate the business or hijack the business’s identity in order to steal money or property, often by establishing lines of credit with banks and/or retailers. A corporate identity is an asset that needs protection!

Who is targeted?

The potential for more lucrative results has spawned an evolution of identity theft.  Rather than targeting a consumer, identity thieves are targeting unsuspecting businesses because businesses tend to have larger bank account balances, higher credit limits, and larger purchases made on behalf of a corporate entity generally don’t set off bells and whistles.  Small businesses are particularly vulnerable because they don’t have resources to constantly monitor accounts and records, and because they don’t have the structured security that large businesses have.

What is the result?

Generally, the damage that results from business identity theft is more severe than the results from consumer identity theft.  In consumer identity theft, the consequences tend to reach only the consumer targeted.  In business identity theft, the consequences affect the targeted business, but also the business’s employees and subcontractors, the business’s creditors, and the economy at large.

You might struggle obtaining a line of credit, which could impact operations. The cost of repairing or cleaning up the aftermath of a business identity theft can be costly with legal and accounting fees.

The terrible irony is that few businesses and business owners think about identity theft prevention as asset protection. But it actually is the most important asset protection plan a business can have.

How to prevent it?

At the Walk Law Firm, as Tampa small business attorneys, we advise our clients to take the same actions that public companies take:

  1. Protect your business information records – treat your EIN and Tax ID numbers like they are your social security number and limit access to all corporate records
  2. Monitor your corporate filings – many secretaries of state, including Florida, have email alert systems that notify you of any and all activity – enrolling in this service can provide early fraud detection
  3. Segregate Duties – accountants and auditors will tell you that no employee should be given access to all banking information as well as typical bank logins and passwords; segregate the duties relating to account access from those handling payroll and accounts payable
  4. Monitor your accounts and bills – frequent monitoring and reporting of suspicious transactions will limit your liability significantly
  5. Monitor the business’s credit report – routinely obtain a business credit report and review it for suspicious activity
  6. Train your employees to protect business information and to be aware of these crimes
  7. Be wary of phishing scams
  8. Install and utilize a firewall on your business computer and network
  9. Contact your creditors to ask about unusual activity

 

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