About Rochelle Friedman Walk, Esq.

Rochelle Friedman Walk, Esq. is an experienced, thoughtful and strategic attorney, business executive and neutral mediator. She has been court-appointed as a receiver and mediator, and is a member of the FINRA arbitration panel. She is known for her negotiating skills and the ability to bring parties together in win-win, creative solutions. She offers a practical and business-oriented approach to the practice of law. Her background in business enables her to relate well to clients and to quickly define the work and potential solutions. In her more than twenty-five years of business and legal experience, she has served as the chief restructuring officer, chief administrative officer, chief legal officer and Business Unit Manager to several national and multi-national business organizations. As an attorney, she has represented clients in a wide range of legal transactions and disputes including complex commercial, insurance coverage, real estate, construction, financial restructuring and employment matters. She has served as an ombudsman in employment, elder care, NAACP, creditor and shareholder matters and has worked with a number of different international unions to resolve concerns. Ms. Walk is a Martindale-Hubbell Preeminient (AV)-rated lawyer, has been named by Tampa Bay Magazine as one of the Top Lawyers in Tampa Bay (July 2010) and is included in Martindale-Hubbell's inaugural and subsequent editions of its Bar Register of Preeminient Women Lawyers (2011, 2012). A graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Law and Colgate University, she is a Florida Supreme Court Circuit Civil and Appellate certified mediator, licensed to practice law in the States of Florida and Ohio, and is a member of the America Bar Association, Section for Dispute Resolution, the Hillsborough County Bar Association and the Florida Academy of Professional Mediators. She has been recognized by the YWCA as a Woman of Professional Excellence and the Tampa Jewish Community Federation as a Woman of Distinction.She volunteers for SCORE as a presenter on various business topics and serves on the Boards of a number of not-for-profit community agencies in the Tampa Bay area, including a community foundation and assisted living facility. Previously, she served on the Board of a Crisis Nursery.

Five Questions to Ask When Hiring a Lawyer for Your Business

As a General Counsel, I spent a significant amount of time researching and interviewing attorneys and other professionals to represent my company’s interest in litigation and business negotiations. The selection of counsel is a significant investment for a business and is more than a cost. As a matter of fact, selecting the wrong counsel or failing to engage counsel may be the most costly decision a business may ever make.

Business lawyers are not a dime a dozen and all lawyers are not created equally. Experience in business and with specific transactions helps clients set strategy and successfully navigate the most difficult transactions from financing arrangements to large acquisitions of property and negotiations with key employees and contractors. Often, business lawyers are sounding boards to business owners contemplating  confidential business transactions.

With the advent of the internet, it is easy to find lawyers and there are plenty of bidding sites like Elance.com and Guru.com where you can get a flat fee or a cheap quote. As tempting as it is to hire the cheapest lawyer, I strongly suggest that business owners take the time to find the best lawyer for the situation, avoiding what might be a costly mistake. So here are 5* questions I always ask when I engage counsel for business matters:

1. Who at the law firm will handle my work?

  • If it is a team, who will be on the team?
  • Who will be the lead and my contact?
  • How was the team selected?

2. What is [each working attorney’s ] experience in handling matters like the one that I have described?

  • Has this attorney ever handled this type of matter before?
  • Has the lead attorney ever been the lead in a matter like this before?

3. What is the attorney’s and firm’s workload and ability to handle the work in my time-frame?

  • Any time off or vacations planned?
  • Is the lead attorney accessible?
  • How will communications work? Email or Telephone? In Person Meetings?
  • How often should I expect to receive a status report?

4. What does the attorney anticipate the process to be?

  • What outcomes might I expect or should I consider?
  • What are the issues are concerning?
  • Make sure you understand the terms the lawyer uses and do not be afraid to stop a lawyer and ask what something means!

5. Billing and Fees:

  • How does the firm/attorney charge?
  • Can the firm provide a detailed invoice no less often than monthly for my review?
  • How can the firm and I positively or negatively impact fees?

As you can see, fees and costs are last, but not forgotten. It is important to understand that an inexperienced attorney can consume excessive time researching a matter just like a disorganized client can consume excessive amounts of attorney time just to get information gathered — both situations can significantly increase legal cost.

I have found that for some matters, an hour of a very experienced, albeit pricey, lawyer’s time is often more valuable than ten hours of the time of an attorney who is a newcomer to the topic. When I expect the transaction or litigation to have big rewards or expose my company to significant risk, I choose experience over hourly rate every time.

*By way of disclaimer, I usually ask more than 5 questions, I always do plenty of research,  and I also ask business friends and other professionals I trust for referrals to appropriate business lawyers. My five questions are in addition to references and research.

 

 

When is the Best Time to Call Your Business Lawyer — Before You Make a Costly Mistake

In this day and age of lean budgets and concerns about return on investment, I find that many clients tend to shy away from calling legal counsel until the issue at hand has escalated to an uncontrollable level. I actually understand that, because, like my clients, I am a small business owner, with a limited budget and limited resources. I find myself watching every dollar and carefully assessing the return on my investment before clicking on my PayPal or writing a check for clicks and views, plaques and, most recently, the expense of being listed as a Top-Rate Lawyer in Tampa.  I even assess the return on legal research systems and online databases.

So how does spending to be listed as a Top-Rated Lawyer in Tampa compare with spending money on lawyers you may ask? It all comes down to return on investment. I am asked to sponsor groups, which I often do. I am asked to speak and mentor, which I gladly do, primarily for free. Lexis, WestLaw, bar associations and mediator organizations have pay-to-use and pay-to-list publications and systems.  The return on investment is fairly easy to see since my business comes to me by referrals and word of mouth, a little from the internet and mostly from reputation. I also spend some money with marketing firms, accountants, insurance, training and education and other counseling-like resources to gain guidance and to make sure that I am staying on top of  my game. The mostly costly decision I make each day about my business is the one which costs me a client or causes me to have liability for failure to deliver top quality legal services.

So how does that equate to the best time to call a business lawyer? It is before you make a decision that could cost you a sale or client or would create an undue liability for failure to deliver, breach of contract or violations of laws. For my clients, that means thinking about protecting intellectual property, providing standard or customized contracts that customers and suppliers are willing to sign, but still protect business interests, having important agreements drafted or reviewed and compliance with the laws, especially as it relates to employees and the environment so that the business is not shut down. At the Walk Law Firm, we help clients develop strategies for financing and introduce them to concepts and ideas that may be less familiar but ultimately are needed to successfully run a business. Our goal is to provide the legal counsel clients need while making sure they receive a good return on investment.

In the last few weeks, we have helped clients mediate and settle a wrongful discharge claim, resolve preference actions, navigate loan modifications  and handle a variety of after-the-fact situations that might have been avoided if we had a short conversation before a decision was made. This month, I have also found financing for a client who did thought Bankruptcy was the only option because we talked early and developed a strategic plan. After the fact, the legal fees plus the cost of settlement are often far greater than what one might anticipate in an early resolution or for a short conversation to set strategy.

For me, the best time to to call a business lawyer, is when you need to make tough decisions or when you are considering future growth and divestment strategies.  Consider a small retainer relationship with your lawyers and ask to have it cover periodic phone calls and questions. We do it for our clients so that clients can call whenever they need a little bit of legal counsel or advice before making a decision which could lead to a costly mistake.

To learn more, please visit our website at WWW. WalkLawFirm.com

 

Attorney Rochelle Friedman Walk has Achieved the AV Preeminent® Rating – the Highest Possible Rating from Martindale-Hubbell®.

NEWS:    In the world of lawyers, there are many honors and opportunities to buy plaques and spend money to bolster one’s career, but in my book, only some honors worthy of sharing. I have recently learned that I was named a Top Lawyer in Tampa Bay for 2012 and again for 2013 by Law.com, the National Law Journal and some other related publications. This honor stems from my AV – Preeminent Rating, which I achieved and have maintained for more than 10 years. It truly is an honor to be rated by other attorneys in the top category for both ethical standards and legal ability. Some details of the honor:

Rochelle Friedman Walk, a lawyer and mediator based in Tampa, FL whose primary areas of practice are Business and Commercial Law and Alternative Dispute Resolution, has earned the AV Preeminent® rating from Martindale-Hubbell®

“Tampa, FL, March 4, 2013 – Martindale-Hubbell, a division of LexisNexis®, has confirmed that attorney Rochelle Friedman Walk still maintains the AV Preeminent Rating, Martindale-Hubbell’s highest possible rating for both ethical standards and legal ability, even after first achieving this rating in 2002,” according to the press release I received today.

The Martindale-Hubbell AV Preeminent® rating was started more than 130 years ago and is used by attorneys while searching for their own expert attorneys. With websites and social media, anyone can determine a lawyer’s rating by looking  it up on Lawyers.com or martindale.com. The Martindale-Hubbell® AV Preeminent® rating is the highest possible rating for an attorney for both ethical standards and legal ability. This rating represents the pinnacle of professional excellence. It is achieved only after an attorney has been reviewed and recommended by their peers – members of the bar and the judiciary.

The Walk Law Firm provides general counsel and mediation services to a diverse array of local, national and even international clients with particular focus on providing practical business counsel and alternative dispute resolution for businesses with small or nonexistent legal departments. I initially launched the firm to better serve business and mediation clients. Our focus is to assist businesses and entrepreneurs achieve their goals in a cost-effective and expedient manner. Our lean cost structure is designed to keep the burden of significant overhead costs low.

I am also a Florida Supreme Court certified Circuit Civil and Appellate Mediator, serve on the FINRA, Bankruptcy Court and Middle District mediation panels, handling business and financial meditations for parties wanting an experienced executive and lawyer mediate their matters.

To find out more or to contact Rochelle Friedman Walk of Tampa, FL, call 813-999-0199, or visit www.WalkLawFirm.com.

As a result of this honor, American Registry LLC, has added Rochelle Friedman Walk to The Registry™ of Business and Professional Excellence. For more information, search The Registry™ at http://www.americanregistry.com.

I am very proud that I have achieved the AV Preeminent® Rating – the highest possible rating from Martindale-Hubbell®.

Business Loans and Personal Guaranties

The most common complaint I hear from business clients is that they cannot find financing. Needless to say, most are elated when they receive loan approval. As a practical business matter, that approval comes with a pile of paper including:

  1. A resolution of the governing board for the business approving the loan and authorizing signatories – Keep a copy of this in your minute or record book, it is an official corporate record;
  2. A Loan Agreement;
  3. A Promissory Note;
  4. A Security Agreement; and
  5. Personal Guaranties of the Owners or Shareholders.

I can write a blog and book on each of these documents, but today I want to focus on Personal Guaranties.

Let’s start by agreeing that Personal Guaranties are a necessary  part of the lending arrangement for small business today. As a business lawyer, I recognize that banks will not make loans without assurances and a way to ensure repayment. Clients generally assume that the Personal Guaranty is required and is limited to the amount of their investment in the business. Personal Guaranties ARE NOT limited automatically. Usually, they are joint and several.

A joint and several guaranty means that each party signing the guaranty is personally responsible for the whole amount due. So if the loan is for $1,000,000 and there are three owners, each owner can be sued for the full amount of $1,000,000, but the lender can only collect the amount once from any one or combination of the the three.

In order to be liable only for an owner’s proportionate share, the guaranty must be a limited guaranty, limiting recourse to a maximum amount or percentage.

To change the loan documents, an owner will need a productive relationship with the businesses bank and banker, and will need to specifically ask for limited recourse. Your business attorney can review the documents and help you negotiate a better deal. We recommend that small businesses find experienced business lawyers with the skills and knowledge to assist you with loan documents.

Please contact us if you have any questions.—-Rochelle Friedman Walk, Esq.

The Benefits of Year-End Corporate Record Keeping

With the end of 2012 fast approaching, it is an excellent time to review your record-keeping practices and make sure your records are updated.  As a small-business owner, you invest a significant amount of time and money to ensure your company’s progress and success, and taking the time now to update your records can help in a number of ways.

How to go about updating records?

Regardless of the form of entity, the manner or process for updating your records is fairly simple and straightforward.  First, it is important to review the entity’s governance documents – yes, the documentation you received and may not have read or reviewed since the time you organized your company – because this documentation will advise you as to how to proceed with corporate changes and updates.  So, if you have a corporation, this will be your articles of incorporation and your bylaws; if you have an LLC, this will be your articles of organization and your operating pr management agreement; and if you have a partnership, this will be your partnership agreement. You may have a shareholders’ or close corporation agreement, too.

Even if you have already implemented transactions, changes and updates in and to the business, it is important to ratify those actions by the manner or process defined in the governance documents.  Why?  In order to record the changes or updates and to evidence the fact that such modifications were authorized by the entity.   Failure to ratify and substantiate a change to the business can create issues like stalled or failed business transactions in the future or undue questions from the IRS or State when they audit. It is much easier to make these recordings contemporaneously with the actions so that later partners and outsiders do not question that authority. Also  as some of our clients will attest, the cost of recreating the history of the company years down the road so that you can sell or move or enter into a significant transaction is costly and time consuming.

Subject to the language in your governance documentation, many updates and changes can be authorized in writing.  Other updates may require a meeting – a board meeting, or a meeting between managers, members, or partners – and a vote.  In the event that you call a meeting, here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Be Prepared and Provide Sufficient Notice to Appropriate Parties
  • Make Sure You Have a Quorum or the Necessary Number of Voting Parties to Take Action and Know What Vote is Necessary to Approve the Actions Desired
  • Have an Agenda and Include Potential Ratification of Past Actions, and Other Potential Actions
  • Record Actions Taken at the Meeting and to whom Future Duties were Assigned
  • Get Feedback to Improve Meeting Process and Record-Keeping
  • Contact Outside Counsel in advance of the meeting if you have any questions and consider having counsel present if you anticipate a contentious issue or needing assistance documenting or explaining the situation

~ Rochelle Friedman Walk, Esq. and Matthew A. Welker, Esq., Walk Law Firm, PA

Welcome to the Walk Law Firm Blog

I am pleased to announce our new blog site. We are working on our new website and will commit to using this blog and our website to provide our clients and friends up-to-date, helpful and interesting business and legal news and pointers for your consideration. Please watch this blog for future posts and articles.

In the meantime,  I am off for the Thanksgiving holiday and want to take this opportunity to thank all of you for your patience and support in our transition our our new firm. We look forward to working with you this year. Matt and Channel will be in the office through Wednesday and we will be closed Thursday and Friday for the holiday. May your holidays be  happy and healthy and may the year be successful.

Best Wishes for a Wonderful Holiday!

For the Walk Law Firm,
Rochelle Friedman Walk, Esq.